baby trusting mommyWhat is trust? Let’s face it, we all are born not knowing how to trust. We learn trust over time from our early caregivers, through mom’s nurturing, gentle loving bond of attachment with us. It is from this state of bondedness that we begin to build trust muscles and the ability to ascertain what is safe and what is not. We learn through trial and error about experiences that are high risk or unsafe. In fact, we never even question or concern ourselves too much with the concept of safety until we have experienced something unsafe. Or for that matter, question what is trustworthy until we have experienced a breach of trust. it’s like we have an automatic cue within us that formats our whole life to confidently expect to trust, and that people are genuinely safe, trustworthy and good… until that fateful day when your beautiful sense of naivety and innocence come crashing around your feet as if your whole world, and your belief system crashed in front of you as you experienced a harsh dose of reality: Not everyone or everything is trustworthy. And yet, we are created with this innate need to trust. it comes naturally to want to trust.

You know it’s true, especially when something has malfunctioned for you in the area of trust. You become aware that something is ‘off’ or not quite right when you experience symptoms such as these:

  • Fear
  • Anger
  • More conscious of feeling unsafe than the ability to trust
  • Cannot trust easily
  • Panic attacks and anxiety
  • More withdrawn than usual
  • Isolated from caring and nurturing relationships
  • Desire to be alone and not have friends or other trustworthy relationships
  • Depression
  • Distraction – doing everything you can not to feel the aloneness you are experiencing in your soul.
  • Hardness of heart. You no longer feel the need for caring, supportive attachments in your life. You feel it is better just to rely on yourself and not let anyone get too close.
  • Self-sufficiency.
  • Irritability with people. Quick to want to run away from or ex-communicate someone from your life when things don’t go the way you want them too.
  • A general sense that something isn’t functioning right within you, which you attribute to why you can’t trust.
  • Avoidance of the issue… close cousins with distraction!
  • The inability to trust or want to. Tied very strongly to a deeply rooted sense of fear of opening up, being known or being vulnerable.

All these and more can be symptoms that you may have a trust issue.broken trust

You may still be stuck at my first paragraph, asking the question, “well how can I trust if I never got that seed of trust planted in my by my early caegivers. I was adopted and rejected by my real parents, or my dad was never there… or my mom was too drunk all the time to nurture me. In fact, I had to take care of her…”

These are all valid points to be sure. For some, it happens later in life… you had the caring parents, but your best friend betrayed you or your spouse is irresponsible with the budget and has racked up a lot of debt with a gambling or shopping addiction, or your wife had an affair…

how can you trust again after these kinds of major betrayals? Stay tuned for my next blog next Friday, as I tackle broken trust more in depth. For today, we will start out with an introduction on what trust is, and how to develop the courage to trust. For further help in the meantime on how to identify what characteristics safe and trustworthy people have, go back and check out my article from several months back on safe people, entitled “Identifying safe people.” or you can also check out my blog on “learning how to attach and bond”. Both deal with how you can repair attachment injuries from early childhood and throughout life that prevent us from entering trusting relationships, as well as giving you some quick identifying tools on how to find safe people and the qualities to look for, when you are ready to take the careful risk of learning to put yourself out there again attempting to build safe and trustworthy relationships.

Trust, in a basic definition, is a skill that can be learned and it always involves choice, and risk. Trust is fragile and can be broken easily through someone not being completely honest, rejection, betrayals, intended to harm, as well as unintentionally.

Trusting requires wisdom and information on how to identify not only what is safe, but the awareness that no one is perfect, and will fail us in small, medium or big ways from time to time throughout the course of our lives. We really need to be aware of not only how much grace others require from us when they fail us, but we also need to see that we are imperfect beings as well, capable of hurting and disappointing others as well. What we need wisdom for is to know the difference between intentional, or major breaches of trust, vs. minor, or unintentional injuries we have incurred.fear vs. courage

Trusting takes great courage and risk, especially if you are still reeling from broken trust, and are still very much in the stage of considering how safe you really are. It takes courage to trust because when you take your guard down, expecting to be met by a compassionate, empathetic understanding of what you have chosen to share that is vulnerable for you, you face the risk of being at least, misunderstood, or at the most, rejected or insulted or yelled at… or even abusive speech or actions.

If your caregivers were able to give you a firm internal sense of safety, dealing with trust issues may not be as devastating as to those who have experienced the loss of love, betrayal or other forms of broken trust. Any traumatic event in your life makes it that much harder to have a sense of trust in others or even yourself. Many people who have experienced broken trust, tend to stop trusting themselves, believing that they are not credible sources of reliability when it comes to identifying who and what is safe. They perceive their ‘radar’ for detecting safety and trust is broken or malfunctioning. This is not necessarily a true fact. It is however, indicative that something has happened that was traumatic enough to disrupt your internal equilibrium, and is evidence that you may need further work on learning to trust yourself again, before you make attempts to trust others. As I mentioned before, information and wisdom are great tools to help you sort out the lies you are now believing about yourself, abilities or discernment as a result of trauma.

What I would suggest is taking some first steps to rebuilding your trust muscle.

First I would recommend to get honest with yourself about the feelings you have, where you feel they originated from, whether or not it is fair of you to place the same expectations of being betrayed onto other people who have not yet betrayed you, as well as considering the facts of the situation… Was it in fact a deliberate betrayal? Perhaps it was merely a momentary carelessness of someone while they are distracted, or self absorbed themselves, which is not a usual characteristic of this person. Was it unintentional? Asking these sorts of questions can help give you a greater sense of clarity of how major the affront was to you. Also, if you are brave enough, you may want to ask the person directly, alone, or bringing someone with you whom you feel safe with, so that you do not receive and dwell on perceived information rather than truth.

It may also help if you can muster up some faith in a positive outcome in the situation you are currently facing. Focusing on your future ability to enter into trusting relationships again, can also take away from the fear of dwelling on past fears of broken trust.

Prepare yourself to face your fears of rejection… and always weigh out what is more important to you in this moment… your need to feel safe, or your need to connect and attach, and determine the risk factors involved with each person you are considering trusting. Do not assume they are all like the person who broke your trust. Watch them from a distance over time to observe their character, and trust with small amounts of information  before you risk giving your all to another person, especially if you have only just  met. Watch your assumptions and judgments. These can lead to a lot of confusion and mixed messages. Always ask clarifying questions so that you are sure that you are not believing false information that you have perceived.

I commend you for reading this article on trust, as it indicates to me, that you are already starting the process of gathering information on how to trust again, which means you have come back to the awareness that no man is an island, and that we are all designed to trust, and in fact, NEED to trust, and have safe and supportive people in our lives. I encourage you to check out my other blogs which give further tips on how to communicate effectively and what the characteristics of healthy relationships look like, as well as the ones I mentioned above. I also invite you to check out my website at http://www.freedomlifelove.com and the link should also be at the top of my blog page as well! Good luck on your journey of trusting again, mustering up that courage and faith to believe that there are in fact trustworthy people out there, and even that those who have been untrustworthy in the past can in fact make changes in their lives and once again become someone with whom you can trust. I must warn you however, that this is not always the case… sometimes those relationships need to end, if there is no repentance or ability to admit their wrong against you and make no attempt of rebuilding trust with you. Trust is built, and earned after a breach of trust. It is never to be given without changes that you can observe in them to see that indeed, they have become trustworthy again. See my blog: Identifying Safe People for the characteristics you will need to see in the person who has broken your trust.

Good luck and please feel free to contact me via my website for any further coaching you may need on finding safe people and working through the trauma of broken trust!

http://www.freedomlifelove.com/Pages/TraumaRecoveryProgram.aspx

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