Believe it or not, worry can actually be beneficial and even helpful if it moved us to take action to solve a problem, or gives us the motivation to complete a task by the deadline. But sadly, and most unfortunately, worry can also be the very cause of decreasing your ability to complete the task at hand, especially when you become centered around your worry, and pre-occupied with the worried thought that cripples your ability to do anything BUT worry!

You can become paralyzed by worry, and almost make a full time profession out of it! Sadly, it doesn’t pay well when it comes to salary! In fact the physical payoffs of worry can be really quite difficult to deal with and can become harmful to our bodies over prolonged worry. Some of us worriers are so used to worry, that we seek stressful situations out, because we don’t know how to function when not in a crisis.

Constant worrying can disrupt healthy sleeping patterns, keep you tense, edgy and jumpy during the day, and interfere with normal day to day routines.

Negative beliefs are often the culprit underneath the worry. It might be useful to dig a little deeper about what is just beneath the surface of your worry. Worrying about your worry only adds to the problem at hand. Worrying may feel like a form of protection to you, but it isn’t true, especially for chronic worriers, when worry leaves you less productive than you could be without it! But we love our coping mechanisms and we are used to them. And they are familiar to us, and what is familiar feels comfortable, even if it leaves you feeling the uncomfortable side effects of the worry habit.

Once you realize worry is the problem, you are halfway there to winning the battle of worry and taking back control over what you allow your mind to dwell on. The Bible has useful advice when it says do not worry about tomorrow for each day has enough trouble of its own!

I personally believe that worry largely has to do with the felt need to control something outside of your ability to control. Don’t mistake my opinion as being one from a distant observer of worry. I have wrestled with worry and anxiety at varying occasions and seasons of my life. I wrestle with anxiety currently in fact, and I need to frequently use tools to manage my emotions, thoughts and physical symptoms during this season of repair in my life. I will touch on some great tips next week for worry and anxiety.

Let me just touch on what is considered to be generalized anxiety vs an anxiety attack to clarify the differences, and help you chart whether you have occasional worry that is useful to you or harmful, and how to know when worry becomes anxiety and what type.

Generalized anxiety consists of chronic worry, like we just talked about, and nervousness and tension in the body. Generalized anxiety is quite simply stated: generalized. It is a general feeling of dread or feeling uneasy but not having a clearly stated aggressor. It just affects your whole life and it affects all areas of your life, everything from finances to career, to relationships, health issues, you name it! It is mentally and physically exhausting and drains you of energy you need throughout the day! It is difficult, almost nearly impossible to feel calm and relaxed. It disrupts normal life… But you have known it long enough to feel like it is normal.

You may have an anxiety disorder if you identify with the following symptoms:

Are you constantly tense, worried, or on edge?

Does your anxiety interfere with work, school or family responsibilities?

Are you plagued by irrational fears but can’t get rid of them anyway?

Do you avoid every day situations because they cause you anxiety?

Do you believe something bad will happen if things aren’t done a certain way?

Do you feel like catastrophe or danger are lurking around every corner?

Do you experience sudden unexpected attacks of panic?

Symptoms of anxiety attacks include:

Surges of overwhelming panic

Feeling a loss of control

Feeling like you are going crazy

Hyperventilation

Heart palpitations & chest pain

Trouble breathing

Hot flashes or chills

Trembling or shaking

Nausea or stomach cramps

Feeling detached, unreal, numb, or removed from the present, stuck in a past traumatizing event.

Post traumatic stress occurs after a traumatic or life threatening event. It does not only include those who have suffered from an extreme accident, physical or sexual abuse, living in a war torn country, or being in the military exposed to traumatic war experiences. It can include anything that brings about the same symptoms. Some people experience extreme trauma after a break up of a significant relationship, or when they become aware of their partner’s cheating, rape, kidnapping, natural disasters etc.

If you feel a lessened awareness of yourself (dissociation, or experience flashbacks of a painful or traumatic event, experience changes in how you think or feel about yourself, disruptions in your level of feeling safe, loss of trust in yourself, anger, loss of self esteem, feelings of chronic emptiness, and feelings of helplessness, are withdrawn from other’s as a result, avoid situations or places that remind you of the event, experience changes in eating habits (weight gain or weight loss) just to name a few, you may be experiencing trauma of some sort. See the attached picture for some more common symptoms of post traumatic stress disorder. To be diagnosed as having PTSD you must be experiencing your symptoms for more than 1 month in each of the following categories:

– Re-experiencing symptoms -flashbacks, nightmares, surging heart rate
– Avoidance and Numbing – avoiding places that remind you of the event, feeling distant or numb, difficulty feeling positive feelings such as love, happiness etc.
– Hyper arousal symptoms – outbursts of anger, being ‘jumpy’ or easily startled, difficulty concentrating
– Acute stress disorder – experiencing your symptoms for more than a month
– Your symptoms are negatively interfering with you work or relationships

Only a trained professional can truly diagnose you with PTSD, but if you identify with the summary of symptoms it might be time to make an appointment with your doctor and a PTSD therapist!

Stay tuned next Friday for tips on managing stress, worry and anxiety!

If you’d like to look at another great resource, check out my one-on-one Boundary Development Program which will help bring control back into your life or my Trauma Recovery Program for training on tools to help cope with past trauma! And don’t forget, I also have a free monthly webinar on stress management, Sign-Up Today!! 

Cheers!

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If you have any questions on today’s blog or would like help on taking steps forward, I’d love to hear from you!  Post a comment below or visit my website and register for your Complimentary Strategy Session to discuss your situation in more detail.

Katie Meilleur – Certified Life Coach

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